News + Events

Fall 2018 IDAH Events

During the 2018-2019 academic year, the Institute for Digital Arts & Humanities will explore the theme: Marking the Arts and HumanitiesBy extending last year’s theme on making, we hope to interweave making with marking to create countless opportunities to critically engage the sources and processes that comprise a layered approach to the theories and praxes underlining the digital arts and humanities.

 

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

9:30 AM11:00 AM

When students transcribe and mark up primary sources, they learn the kind of close reading that is necessary for historical interpretation. When their professors teach transcription and markup, they can discover new research projects and make an impact on their fields. In 2004, Kathryn Tomasek began to work with colleagues to build transcription and markup into an undergraduate course. Join us to hear more about her story and experiences in "Making Data with Markup."

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

2:00 PM3:00 PM

Daniel Story, PhD Candidate in History, Digital Methods Specialist for the Institute Digital Arts & Humanities, and American Historical Review podcast host, will interview Dr. Kathryn Tomasek, Professor of History at Wheaton College with a particular focus on the United States in the 19th century. Daniel and Kathryn will explore the role digital methods play in traditional history scholarship and how digital methods support the development of new forms of historical scholarship that make the digital more explicit. They will also trace the impact of digital methods in research and teaching through Kathryn’s own trajectory as both a traditional and digital historian and a history teacher.

Thursday, November 15, 2018

11:00 AM1:00 PM

This two-hour workshop will present strategies for effectively integrating digital projects into undergraduate courses.  By examining effective cases of assignments linked to digital projects, participants will consider how to make room for such assignments in a syllabus, how to tie digital projects to a course’s learning outcomes, and how to scaffold both technological and content learning to allow students to make positive contributions to a long-term project external to the course.  Participants will leave with a set of proven examples of effective assignments, preliminary plans for assignments for their own courses, and suggestions for how to find collaborative partners in library and technology services for such projects at Indiana University. 

Friday, February 08, 2019

11:00 AM12:30 PM

The Indiana University Libraries has a gold mine of digital collections that can be used for computational analysis. This workshop is focused on using archival finding aids from IU LIbraries' Archives Online. You will learn how to find information encoded in these documents, extract it automatically using XPath and XQuery, normalize your findings using Open Refine, and present it in an interactive timeline using Timeline JS. No prior experience is required.

Friday, April 19, 2019

11:00 AM12:30 PM

The Indiana University Libraries has a gold mine of digital collections that can be used for computational analysis. This workshop is focused on using full text from our literary collections. You will learn how to prepare these texts for analysis with a focus on condolence analysis using Voyant. No prior experience is required.